Tag Archives: a very revolutionary road trip

A Very Revolutionary Road Trip: Colonial Williamsburg, VA

6 Jun
The Capitol at Colonial Williamsburg.

The Capitol at Colonial Williamsburg.

It seems appropriate that, as most of the events I blogged about this week either happened in Williamsburg or were instigated in Virginia, I ought to recommend it as a stop on the Very Revolutionary Road Trip. … I would have included it anyway because if I was given the opportunity, I’d pack up and move there tomorrow because I am the nerdiest girl who ever lived… but that’s a story for another day.

Williamsburg, as I discussed earlier this week, became the capital of Virginia in the 1690’s after fire destroyed the Jamestown Statehouse for the third time. ┬áIt remained the capital until 1779 when Governor Thomas Jefferson and the Virginia legislature moved to Richmond, which was considered a more defensible position (perhaps against the British, not so much).

It was in Williamsburg where the Virginia legislature instructed Richard Henry Lee to make a motion in the Continental Congress for independence from England. Williamsburg was where Thomas Jefferson learned law and liberty from George Wythe, where George Washington got his first lick at politics in the Virginia House of Burgesses, where Patrick Henry served as the first governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia… I could go on for days. It’s importance cannot be understated.

Also not to be understated is the magnificence of the restoration of the historic area and the historical programs. Every day on Duke of Gloucester Street, you can walk into shops and government buildings as though you had walked through a door into the 18th century. In the afternoons, you can take part in the Revolutionary City program, which is a sort-of roving outdoor play that portrays the different experiences of early Americans during the War for Independence.

If you go, don’t miss any opportunity to see George Washington or Thomas Jefferson, and be sure to stop at Chowning’s Tavern at 9pm for 18th century tavern entertainment! Drinks, games, music, and other entertainment make for an excellent end to any day.

Visit their website for more details — but just take my word for it and go. I mean it. Now. Why are you still here?? Get in your car and start driving!